Daddy, I want to buy Luella (2009)

 

luella

It’s a sad day for British fashion. I have been keeping this news under raps since first thing this morning when Grazia tweeted the revelation. Not wanting to admit to tweeting in the office I kept my lips sealed (and held back the tears). Then about 3.00pm a girl from the fashion team ran over to our desks and gasped ‘Luella’s gone bust!’

‘Noooooo!’ cried the features writer. We all felt her pain until we realised that her upset was of a more selfish disposition, ‘What about my feature?! I was supposed to be doing it on Luella’. Bad times all round then. It is indeed the very same features writer who hangs her beautiful navy, velvet trimmed Luella blazer on proud display every morning.  Not for much longer I’m guessing.

But if we pan out from the panic of the fashion magazine and take a look at the bigger picture, it really does deserve some thought and consideration. Over the last decade Bartley has built a cool, credible brand that is distinctly British. British fashion was once so very cool. Biba, the Mods and the punks were part of creating a rock n’ roll solid rep for London. Bartley continues that tradition: her clothes are edgy, they are playful and they are cool.  Just like the Bartley brand – the working mum who loves nothing more than surfing in Cornwall and spending time with her gorgeous family. We bought into it all – so why do people want out?

After the features writer had digested the news, she sat back down and picked up the papers that had fallen on the floor  in her rage. Just like the long line of cut features and bankrupt fashion houses, another one bites the dust.

AMS

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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Daddy, I want to buy Luella (2009)

  1. S

    I’m wearing my Luella fox t-shirt today in protest.

    I think it’s terrible. I really loved Luella and was inspired by the looks every season. It was quirky in a sea of sexy-faced Balmain drones. And it proved that British creatives can run businesses as well as make blood-spattered gimp clothes, which is a lot of the scene here. But obviously there was a business problem behind the scenes.

    I really wanted that jumper with the little bow.

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